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The Budokwai

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Archived Articles

Archived discussion articles can be reached by following the index below or using search on the discussion page.

 

Comments on  - Is Judo for me?

Budokwai pronunciation

Knighthood Society

Women In Judo

Training

Website

Ten Good Reasons

Training abroad
MORE SENIOR PERSONALITIES
Kano in South America

Finding People and Old Members

Looking for clubs

Disabled People in judo
More Karate Information

Olympic Judo
Secret Weapons of Jujutsu Book Announcement


Is Judo for me?

From: William .B
Category: Judo

Comments   I am a 20 year old 6ft  21st (more muscle than fat) male and have practised judo on and off (due to studies) for a year. I am going to start takeing it seriously now and train more often but i find it cumbersom to train with smaller people,which means most people, and women - i am afraid of injuring them. But only when they try to throw me not vice versa. I would also like to know if it is too late as a beginner to actually acheive anything - i am quite mobile but very unfit. Can anyone offer me advice? Thanks, Will.

Re: Is Judo for me?

From: Diana Birch
Category: Judo

Comments  - Nice to hear from you Will. I'm sure you will get encouragement from others responding to your queries and also from the instructors. As a doctor, I am somewhat sceptical about your comment of 'more muscle than fat' and wonder if you are loooking at your size through rose glasses? Most of us do that - you would probably benefit from a bit of weight loss and a healthy diet which would help your mobility and general fitness. I would suggest you start training regularly but gently and gradually work up your regime. The Saturday class is a good start point. I must say - I'm sure you didn't mean it but your comment on not liking to practice with women when they try to throw you - although it's OK when you throw them - sounds a bit chauvinistic. We women are not just cannon fodder you know, as I would hope to illustrate to you if we shuld ever meet on a saturday! Anyway - nice to see you use the site - keep surfing and see you on the mat!

Re: Is Judo for me?

From: Syd
Category: Judo

Comments - Come up on a tuesday or thursday night - we have a number of big fit guys who will be able to give you a good practice.

Re: Is Judo for me?

From: William B

Category: Judo

Comments  - thank you for the advice, but i'd just like to state that it was in no way meant to be sexist - sorry if it seemed that way - and yes i plan to lose weight. But one more thing - do u think it is too late to acheive sporting success? Thanks - ps this is a great forum for discussion is it ok to add the site to other sites links? if yes consider it done

Re: Is Judo for me?

From: Diana
Category: Judo

Comments - I was joking when I said you sounded sexist! I would not think it was too late to acheive success if you train hard. Hope to see you on the mat. - Links are great - email me and tell me where you put them.

I

s Judo For Me

From: John
Category: Judo
Comments - It is hard to advise you on judo when it is unclear what you wish to achieve from the sport. The more you put into any sport, the greater your level of commitment, the more you get in return. As a 20 year old you obviously have a degree of potential and this will be increased if you have been involved in other sports and athletic pursuits. What you achieve is very much down to you.

Dave Starbrook one of the UK's best known competitive judo players started at a similar age to you and represented the GB at World and Olympic competition. There are also people who have started judo in their thirties and forties and gained their dan grade. Obviously they felt judo had something to offer them, but may also be using it more as a social activity, as a form of keeping fit, for self-defence etc.

As a big person, it helps if you have people of a similar size to practice with. Someone who is large or particularly strong will inevitably have an advantage oevr a smaller lighter person and for this reason competition these days is very much run in weight categories. Practicing with people of a similar size also helps promote good judo as any player to be successful needs to have good technique rather than simply being able to rely on their physique.

I trust this helps your thinking

To Join?

From: Kevin Mullins
Category: Judo
Date: 03 Apr 2001

Comments

Hello,

I am toying with the Idea of re-starting Judo. I have acheived 1st Kyu whilst in my early 20's and also represented the Welsh Judo Association at affiliated BJA fights.

I am now 27 and have not done any Judo for 6 years. My main sport now is Rugby though I do that mainly as a fitness thing rather than seriously.

I am keen to join again and am wondering whether there are waiting lists or any other barriers that may stop me becomming a member. I do/did have a BJA License though I suspect that has expired and I will need to start my grading rank again (which I don't mind doing).

I live in Earlsfield and getting to and From Fulham is not a problem for me.

Any comments or information would be gratefully appreciated.

Regards,

Kevin Mullins kevin.mullins@kdmtechnologies.com

 

From: Diana
Category: Judo
Date: 16 Apr 2001

Comments

Glad to hear from you and hope yo will come back. Tuesday or thursday 6.30 beginners as a warm up followed by the later 7.30 class would be good -

 

Budokwai Pronunciation

From: Syd Hoare
Category: Judo
Comments - The name of the club is pronounced BUDOHKAI. The W in the name stems from the old way of writing Japanese words in English. Kai or Kan for example were written in the Japanese alphabet as KUAI and KUAN but were never pronounced as such. They were always sounded as Kai or Kan

Re: Budokwai pronunciation

From: Webmaster
Category: Judo
Comments - Thank you for that snippet Syd. Very interesting - but what does it mean?

From: Peter  Bellamy in Tokyo
Category: Judo

Comments - If you wish to write the name "budokwai" in Japanese hieroglyphics (Kanji) on a modern computer starting from the romanized version, then you write it as follows:- "bu do u ka i "and only then will it transliterate into the Japanese kanji characters correctly..So I am afraid that Syd Hoare is not quite correct. Sorry Syd. "H" is out and "u" is in today. Trust me, I just checked it on another computer set up for English(romanised Japanese) into Japanese.The "u" acts to lengthen the "o" sound but is essential when writing in hiragana (Japanese phonetics) or even katakana (phonetics used to write foreign words in Japanese). So Syd Hoare becomes "sido ho-a" peter becomes pi-ta-. Sometimes very cute words appear. I leave you to figure out some of them.

Re: Budokwai pronunciation
Category: Judo

Comments - Budo when used by the Japanese does not simply translate as martial art/s in the way a foreigner might use it. (ie. What martial art do you do?) Bujitsu would be closer to what you have in mind. To say 'martial way/art' begs the question. What does a 'way or art' mean in this context? My Kojien dictionary defines Budo as 'The Way that the warrior(Bushi) should follow'(bushi ga mamoru beki michi). Michi(way) is defined by the Kojien as simply(1) a path but also as morality(dotoku), duty(giri), teachings(oshie) etc. So I think when Koizumi translated Budokwai as Way of Knighthood Society he was not so far off the mark.     Syd Hoare

Re: Budokwai pronunciation

From: Peter  Bellamy in Tokyo
Category: Judo

Comments - Well, of course, everyone knows that "budo" means grapes and wine. Kai is a type of seashell. So, the Budokwai is a place for wine and sea food, both of which are excellent for one's health I drink to all your good health.

Re: Budokwai pronunciation
From: Arthur Tansley
Category: Judo

Comments - The Way of Knighthood Society is a bit flowery. Budo is usually translated as martial or military ways. Therefore Budokwai is the Martial ways society, Nothing to do with King Arthur or medievale knights.

Re: Budokwai pronunciation
From: Peter  Bellamy in Tokyo
Category: Judo

Comments

Syd is closer than most in his definition of "Budo". If you read EJ HARRISON's book "Fighting Spirit of Japan" you'll discover that the budo of that era, the 1890s, was akin to the Edo era samurai (samurai meaning -to serve one's lord. Even to die at his lord's command.) Judoka used to take formal farewell of their parents before going to a contest as there was a good possibility of them being killed. ATEWAZA, the blow strikes to cripple or kill techniques were not banned at that time. They are now! What we call today "martial arts" is a very mild and gentle game, unlike the true martial arts which were ONLY designed to kill or incapacitate one's opponents on the field of war.In or out of armour. Some of today's kata still reflect this aspect. The Japanese police still train at taihojitsu, wearing armour, so they can deliver what are crippling or even killing blows to their opponents. Gunii Koizumi probably had the old way in mind when he coined the name "Budokwai". The "way of service to one's Lord, a philosophy of giving one's life in the service of the lord one served. Death before dishonour. The way is similar to that of Buddha, the eightfold path to Nirvana. You must also remember that the Buddhist priest of old Japan were not the "turn the cheek" types at all. Nichiren was especially warlike as many a Daimyo (local feudal lord) found out to his sorrow. So the way was a philosphical way, an ethical mental path of self-development that Jigoro Kano superimposed on the jujitsu techniques of the 1800s to form the basis of the Kodokan philosophy. Read Harrison's book. It may still be in some libraries if you really want to know what the term "budo" means

 

Knighthood Society

From: Simon Grove
Category: Judo

Comments

Is the judo at the club any different now from what it was in GK's time?

Re: Knighthood Society

From: Peter Bellamy in Tokyo
Category: Judo

Comments

Possibly just a trifle different. In the fifties/early sixties, judo was an up and growing sport. Beginner's classes were running regularly and the randori sessions took place afterwards. Children's classes and the Ladies section were in full steam. We did promotional shows all over the home counties and of course there was the annual show at the Royal Albert Hall. Gleason & Palmer were doing a stalwart job of leading the club and the first of the BJA coahes were trained there and examined there. Sundays saw Trevor Leggett teaching a Dan grade class every week, so there was sufficient instruction for all from beginners to highly effective international contest players. Budokwai members have scattered all over the world over the years so i have no ideahat it is like today but I can say the fifties and early sixties were a great time to be a member of the Budokwai. I sincerely hope that this is true today. If not, then perhaps the current instructors should take a hard look at what they are doing. As Geoff Gleason said to would-be coaches, such as myself, "There are no Bad students, only poor teachers". The teachers are responsible for the way their students develop. Good teachers, good club.

Knighthood Society

From: Phil Rawlings
Category: Judo

Comments

I have read SydHoare's comments about the name Budokwai (see pronunciation) and it seems to me that Koizumi must have been a very honest person. What was he like? Was he a samurai of the old school

Re: Knighthood Society
From: Syd Hoare
Category: Judo

Comments

Koizumi or GK as he was known to most was very honest. When he set up the Budokwai in 1918 as a members club he was the first to pay his membership subscription. During shaky periods of the clubs history such as during the war he supported it financially. When GK got quite old he was actually quite impoverished though nobody knew it but he never asked the club for money or took any in any form. This is just one illustration of the man - there were many others.

Re: Knighthood Society

From: A.R.Menzies
Category: Judo

Comments

Re article by Simon Grove December '99. Is this the Simon Grove of the old CDJS ? If it is please reply to wingfeld@ouvip.com.

 

Women In Judo

Re: Women in Judo

From: Herve' Lemarechal
Category: Judo

Comments

About my research. As you know i focuse on female judo during a period ranging from the 40' to the 60'. Of course there is an anecdotic part in my work: rescuing major figures from oblivion. But the main part consists of telling female judo development. After me, female judo history closed for good in the eighties once female judo had become an olympic event. Therefore i plan to unveil the "hidden face" (the "neglected face"?) of female judo: this famous 40'-60' period. I don't wish to compare this period with the modern one: considering that early women judoka were not allowed to compete yet, any comparison would be out of interest.

Great Britain and France (and perharps the States, i shall have to check it) were the very first West countries to be involved in judo. From the Channel's french side i have gathered interesting material: press cuttings, books, pictures, accounts, etc. I have located the very first french woman to be given the black belt (Mme LEVANNIER) and sent mails to several women black belt from the 50'. I go on looking for unknown When i have free time enough, i shall summ up all that stuff and send it to you. The temporary conclusions are pretty unusual.

Of course i lack Channel's opposite side material. I'd like to answer the following questions among many others: - How british women were teached judo duting this period? - Considering women were not allowed to compete, which goal was assigned to their practice? - Was judo for women more popular in Great Britain than in France? - How female judo was described in the news, movies and magazines of those days? - And many other questions.

Perharps are you in relation with veterans judo women who could answer these questions. Gathering Dame RUSSEL-SMITH or Sarah MAYER's account would be fantastic; unfortunately, both have passed out. I'm sure there are many other unknown serious women judoka whose account is worth beeing picked up.

Re: Women in Judo

From: Webmaster
Category: Judo

Comments

Thanks for your enquiry. It's good to see that we are getting a following in France. You will be able to find information on these and other Judo personalities on the website. If You use the search facility it will tell you all the instances of the names. For example - there are photographs of Iris Dehnel in 'Rogue’s Gallery' and she appears in the directory a-d; Past Personalities archive and in the history section. Follow the hyperlinks. I will make further enquiries regarding information on the Judo ladies and send to you. In return it would be helpful if you could give me information which you obtain. It is good to see the website used in this manner - I am aiming to make it a useful reference for those interested in Martial art. Keep in touch. I'll also post your letter on the comments section since you may then get more information from other 'surfers'! Regards – Diana - Webmaster

Re: Women in Judo

From: Hervé LEMARECHAL
Category: Judo

Comments

I visited your directory yesterday and learned a lot of thing about several women judokas. I remain "fascinated" with Sarah MAYER's story. This woman's career seems to symbolize women’s emancipation. You are right with dedicating bibliographical notes to famous past judokas: it a good way for protecting them from oblivion. They deserve it.

 

Re: Women in Judo

From: Herve Lemarechal
Category: Judo

Comments

i'm looking for Margot SATHAYE's "Judo for women", a book she wrote in the early sixties. Did you ever hear of it? Finding it is impossible here. I'm ready to buy it at a price (preferably cheap!).

Perharps are there in the Budokwaï's Librairy press cuttings or collection of pics centered on female judo. Could you provide information? I'm ready to cross the Channel in order to check it out (if allowed to). Au revoir.

Re: Women in Judo
From: Diana Birch
Category: Judo

Comments

I have a copy of margot's book. There are a number of other Judo women who I could give you information on - what time period are you looking at - new players also or just older ones? Dame Enid Russell Smith is on the site as one of the older judoka.

who were the first female judoka?

From: Juanjo Sanchez Arreseigor
Category: Judo

Comments Helo: (apologize by my bad englesh language) I'm a serious spanish Historian and I'm seeking information about women's judo history because I have to write a short work by one spanish martial arts magazine. In fact I have finished the article but I discover a hole in my informations. I have information about first female judokas in USA, Great Britain and other countries, the first female in Budkwai, the first USA women in the Kodokan, the first japanese female teacher who go out of Japan, etc... but I not find the name of the first women who learn judo. I supossed she would be japanese, but i discover NOTHING about she. (I'm searching across the net and books some weeks ago without sucess)

I like to learn some thing about Jigoro Kano thinks about women in judo (I meet a photo of Kano teaching a girl in judoinfo.com web site)

¿Can you help me? My email is arreseigor@hotmail.com

From: Diana - Webmaster
Category: Judo

Comments

thanks for your enquiry - sorry about delay - I've just got back from japan. The first one I can find a trace of is Emily Diana Watts who started learning jujutsu in 1903. I would imagine that there must have been women in Japan at a much earlier date however but it was probably something which was not reported because it was quite common - I may be wrong but I think that female members of samurai families had their own styles of cambat techniques. There are a few historians looking into female judoka - notably Dickie Bowen (see history section) ; Joe Svinth who has just got an article in - see Ancient Martial arts page and Herve Le Marechal is doing research in France. If you want to email them send a mail into the site and I'll pass it on.

 

Training

instruction

From: John Lock
Category: Judo

Comments

I have been to a number of sessions at the Budokwai and have found the instruction very patchy. Often there is very little at all. What is the club policy on this? Is the emphasis more on randori?

Re: instruction

From: Andy
Category: Judo

Comments

Roy Inmans instruction on Monday night is brilliant. Pete Bluet hardly coaches at all in his main sessions. There is no judo on Wednesday (bring back Sid his coaching was fantastic). Thursday is now run by Ray Stevens who is doing a good coaching job. A Friday class has been started by Costa who is a good motivator but not that clued up technically. And Saturday is run by Tony Sweeny who in recent years has been seized up with a bad leg and doesnt coach as much as he used to. So a bit patchy I suppose you could say and not a lot of structure to it.

BA - MSc - BJA

From: John Meyer
Category: Judo
Date: 27 Apr 2001

Comments

Since many individuals who have studied a specific subject, like English,sport and science etc. will graduate and achieve a BA / MA / MSc etc - should we not have a similar title for our top Judoka to use? Are they not as well qualified in their own field of expertise? And is not Judo an education for life?

Instruction

 

From: John Lock; Andy
Category: Judo

Comments

instruction  From: John Lock Category: Judo Comments I have been to a number of sessions at the Budokwai and have found the instruction very patchy. Often there is very little at all. What is the club policy on this? Is the emphasis more on randori?

Re: instruction  From: Andy Category: Judo Comments Roy Inmans instruction on Monday night is brilliant. Pete Bluet hardly coaches at all in his main sessions. There is no judo on Wednesday (bring back Sid his coaching was fantastic). Thursday is now run by Ray Stevens who is doing a good coaching job. A Friday class has been started by Costa who is a good motivator but not that clued up technically. And Saturday is run by Tony Sweeny who in recent years has been seized up with a bad leg and doesnt coach as much as he used to. So a bit patchy I suppose you could say and not a lot of structure to it.

general training having been out of the sport for a while

 

From: Richard Barber
Category: Judo
Date: 20 Sep 2001

Comments

I did judo at school from the age of 7 to 14 and got to green belt. I have done no formal judo since then, but I am interested in getting back into the sport, specifically competing. I was wondering whether turning up to the general practice would be over optimistic...

 

 

Website

Development of Budokwai Site

From: Danny Gillard
Category: Judo

Comments

Well done Dianna. This is looking very professional. There is a committee meeting next week and I will reasure them you are doing fine job.

Re: Development of Budokwai Site

From: Diana - Webmaster
Category: Judo

Comments

Thanks for the comment Danny. The site will get better as more members give me information and 'biopics' - how about yours?

Re: Development of Budokwai Site

From: Dave Quinn - World Judo
Category: General

Comments

Nice to see the Budokwai has at last got a quality webmaster working on their site. I'm proud to say I used to train at the Budokwai for a number of years around 1975! Adams was top man, Syd Hoare and Tony Sweeney were my regular senseis and Charles Palmer used to patiently spend extra time with me after practice endeavouring to improve my technique (there you go, no hope for some!) :-)

Re: Website

From: Webmaster - Diana
Category: Judo

Comments

Thanks for your comments and for those of the many others who have e mailed me with encouragement. I'm glad you all like the site - obviously it's updating and changing all the time - that's the thing about a site - it has to be active - one of the worst things about the web I think is when you go to a site and find - 'last updated feb 98' or some such thing - makes you think the people have died or gone bust! A website is not like a book which you write and stick in a library - nor is it like a brochure which gets reprinted when you run out! So thanks to those who have written bits - keep writing!

Re: Development of Budokwai Site

From: Dave Quinn - World Judo
Category: General

Comments

Nice to see the Budokwai has at last got a quality webmaster working on their site. I'm proud to say I used to train at the Budokwai for a number of years around 1975! Adams was top man, Syd Hoare and Tony Sweeney were my regular senseis and Charles Palmer used to patiently spend extra time with me after practice endeavouring to improve my technique (there you go, no hope for some!) :-)

Re: Website

From: Angelo Sanna
Category: Judo

Comments

Thanks for the talk and demo, it was an eye opener to say the least. Hope that the Budokwai will understand what they are missing, and help you in building the best Martial Arts Site in England.

Re: Website

From:
Category: Judo

Comments

good demo - thanks

Re: Website
 

Re: Website

From: Diana

Category: Judo

Comments

THanks Paul - flattery will get you anywhere!

From: Diana
Category: Judo

Comments

Thanks for coming to the website demo. I think it really came to life. Great comments!

Re: Website

From: Diana - Webmaster
Category: Judo

Comments

Welcome to the site and hope to see you at the Budokwai. It's really nice to see so many active Judo people using this as a 'meeting point 'Best wishes

Website

From: Angelo Sanna
Category: General

Comments

I have find your site a very interesting one with plenty of historical facts. I will certainly visite the site again Angelo Sanna Karate instructor

Re: Website

From: Hirotada Koishi
Category: Judo

Comments

I have found Budokai website in Japan 

Ten Good Reasons

From: Webmaster
Category: Judo

Comments

Suggested by a 'browser' we should have ten good reasons for joining the Budokwai. - How about giving me some and I'll pick the best and post them up!

Re: Ten Good Reasons

From: Angelo Sanna
Category: Karate

Comments

1)As a student, I was very proud to be part of such a prestigius and well known club. 2)As a teacher, I was able to boast about the clubs association to the senior instructor in Europe (i.e. Sensei Enoeda). 3)A very good location in posh Chelsea. 4)The very top in teachers and players. 5)very reasonable priced. 6)Full time Dojo. 7)Variety of activities (i.e. Judo, Karate, Aikido etc. etc.) 8)Oldest club outside Japan. 9)Friendly atmosfere. 10)Best instructors in England for both Judo and Aikido.

 

Training abroad

From: Ben Andersen
Category: Judo

Comments

I always take a judo suit with me when travelling abroad since there are Judo clubs everywhere from Chiang Mai to Dakkar and it is an easy and natural way to make friends. I would like to see information about different places to train around the world included in the website and would like feedback from others on experience of clubs abroad.

Training Abroad

NEW YORK

From: Ian
Category: Judo
Date: 18 Apr 2001

Comments

It was good to see everyone in NY and hope you will able to come again. If anyone is in NY and wants to train, send an email. schuler_ian@jpmorgan.com

-ian

raining behind the times in America

From: k91baddog@imt.net
Category: Judo

Comments

In America, our Judo is behind the times. We are so wrapped up in our little fifedomes, rank, and control issues that we are letting modern judo pass us by. Rather than pay attention to the driving leg, the hooking leg, we look at kazushi and o-soto gari. Next time someone does an o-soto gari let me know. We don't practice our throws to completion. We stay standing. Next time someone throws a taiotoshi and remains standing let me know. We spend years teachin ukemi but ignor spin outs. Worst of all, most black belts here couldn't throw my grandmother. They may be godan, but do an ura nage about once evry ten years. I hope things are better in your club. 1 bad dog

Training Abroad

Training Abroad Training abroad  From: Ben Andersen Category: Judo Comments I always take a judo suit with me when travelling abroad since there are Judo clubs everywhere from Chiang Mai to Dakkar and it is an easy and natural way to make friends. I would like to see information about different places to train around the world included in the website and would like feedback from others on experience of clubs abroad

 

From: Bob Darby, Brussels
Category: Judo
Date: 02 Jan 2001

Comments

Like Ben, I frequently travel with my kit. I have been able to find dojos in France (easy) the US - more difficult, but Seattle and San Francisco were both fun; Malmo in Sweden has one of the best fighting sports centres I have come across; Martinique; Rome etc. Living in the Hague and Brussels, I joined local clubs, of course. I have often thought that it would be useful to have a list of clubs where Budokwai people have visited, with phone numbers and directions how to find them. What better way of making links and adding to a holiday or business trip?

From: Diana - webmaster
Category: Judo

Comments

Good idea - why don't we start up a directory of clubs to visit. If you all send in suggestions I'll put it together on one of the webpages for easy reference.

Japan My new home

From: Pete Cacayan
Category: Judo
Date: 12 Aug 2000

Comments

i am moving to japan next year , and am looking forward to studying judo there. However ive heard its much harder training and am wondering if anyone can shed some light as to how different it actually is. i am also trying to find out whats the best way of learning the language and if possible would like to know how Syd Hoare learned japanese and how he got on when he first went there. Thanks. ps i like the site its great for information and functuality

From: Arthur A. Tansley
Category: Judo
Date: 17 Aug 2000

Comments

Judo training anywhere in the world is as hard as you want it to be. Take a look at my new Arthur Tansley's Budo Web Page : http://www.geocities.com/aatansley/ and look under Budo Training in Japan.

As for learning Japanese, either you have a gift for learning languages or not. After 31 years in Japan I still cannot speak or understand Japanese,

Arthur atansley@hpo.net

 

MORE SENIOR PERSONALITIES

From: Alan.R.Menzies
Category: General

Comments

Dr Diana Birch has produced an excellent site for the Budokwai and included in it personalities from some years ago, in fact many years ago. Unfortunately much of the information is out of date because the source was the Judo magazine published from the 1950's to the 1970's. I have volunteered to up date the information as much as possible and several entries are now under re-construction , however I do not have enough information to successfully up date all the entries. If your name is included , or more important if it has been omitted, please send me up to date details that may be be included in this section of the Budokwai Web Site.

You can contact me as follows: e-mail wingfeld@ouvip.com Telephone 01579343773 Snail Mail - Wingfield House, Old Road, Liskeard, Cornwall, PL14 6DW

Alan R. Menzies

 

Kano in South America

From: Mark Feigenbaum
Category: Judo

Comments

Please help. I am researching for a book on Jigoro Kano, and I was so sure that the following took place: J. Kano accepted a challenge from South American jujutsuka in the 1920s, probably closer to 1926. I was so sure of this because I have heard it since I was a yound judoka in the early sixties. I've discussed it with many people, and now, after all these years, I'm being told no one knows of it. Does Anybody have any thing, even just a memory of this shiai in Brazil? I would be eternally grateful. Thanks. Mark F. Feigenbaum Pharm. D., godan Kodokan judo

Re: Kano in South America

From: Dickie Bowen
Category: Judo

Comments

Kano did visit AMerica on several occasions and may have gone to south America too however he was not in that part of the world in 1925 and would have been too old. Also it would not have been in accordance with his attitude to take up such a challenge and there is no record of his having done so. This is probably a confusion with the history of the Gracie brothers who organised contests and displays. They were involved with Mitsuyo Maeda.

 

 

Finding People and Old Members

Budokwai Old Member

From: John Mewett
Category: Website
Date: 17 Feb 2001

Comments

Hello Diana , Congratulations on your fine site ...............you even have me featured on it .........fame at last. To fill in a couple of spaces and to perhaps make myself a little more interesting after my time of fourteen years training at the Budokwai I moved to the midlands where while running my own Jewellery business I opened two Judo clubs. The Windmill Judo club was a very successful junior Judo club and supplied many midland area players the most notable being Bruce Keeling who eventually graduated to the British team........while under my coaching at Loughborough University. The second club was Nottingham Olympic Judo Club a joint venture with my fellow Budokwai and British team mate Dave Lawrence..........together we forged a membership of 400 plus junior members this continued until Dave retired from active coaching. We were coaching in Nottingham for some ten years. During this time I was also chief coach at Loughborough University where I trained 5 National University Champions. During my time at the Budowai apart from my exploits with the British team some other notable happenings were taking part in the 50th anniversary show at the Royal Albert Hall representing the Budokwai on the famous trip to Prague and being a member of the team that won the Club Championship of Great Britain. Also worth a mention is the auspicious occasion when at the European championships myself, John Hindley, Dave Lawrence and Keith Remfry formed half of the British team. As for now I am still actively coaching Judo to schools and have been responsible for introducing the sport to 20 schools in the east midlands It all seems so long ago and your creating this site on this historical club is a wonderful tribute to a society of not only Judo but sporting excellence. On a more practical note I have some old artefacts which you are only to welcome to use if you can glean any info from them eg I have an original programme of the 50th Anniversary Show and other such documents. Well I hope this as not been all that boring to read and thanks for your hard work in getting this wonderful site up and running. Hope to hear from you soon John Mewett

 

Freeman
From: Robert Crowl
Category: Judo

Comments

is the Freeman you have listed as member, Ken Freeman? He was my first sensei at Newark YMCA and later American Budokwai.

 

Re: Freeman

From: Diana
Category: Judo

Comments

There is an article by the freemans at the following point- http://www.budokwai.org/articles.htm#JUDO

 

Re: Freeman

From: Robert Crowl
Category: Judo

Comments

Thank you. Ken Freeman had a great influence on my life. I first meet him at the Newark YMCA in Newark. He opened a club in Clifton, N. J., called the American Budokwai. Many of his students are still playing or teaching. He always spoke fondly of Mr. Kozumi and Mr. Legget and his association with the London Budokwai. Thank you for putting the details on the site.

 

Re: Freeman

From: Webmaster - Diana
Category: Judo

Comments

Update on Freeman - He apparently was awarded his first Dan at the Budokwai in 1944. Nickname 'Pony'. There is an entry in OCt 1946 Budokwai Bulletin which says - The club SAit Honore at 274 Rue St Honore Paris was visited by K and G Friedman on their way to America. M Georges London who runs the club sent an invitation to all members of the Budokwai to visit his club any time if they are in Paris. Mr K Freeman also visited the Judo Club run by M Jean Ziu at 18 Rue de Neuve ST Catherine , Marseilles ...

 

Do you know him? - Jack Poole?

From: Stephen Sweetlove
Category: Judo

Comments

Have you any history of Jack POOLE 3rd Dan. Jack gained his grades in Japan and was a member of the Shanghai Municipal Police. His details can be found on the back of a magazine that came from the Budokwai called Black belt. I am doing this research on behalf of his son and out of a great interest of the Shanghai Municipal Police

 

From: spence@netvigator.com
Category: Judo
Date: 02 Dec 2000

Comments

Stephen Sweetlove - please contact me at spence@netvigator.com regarding Jack Poole and the Shanghai Municipal Police - Karl Spencer, Hong Kong Police !

 

From: ryan osullivan
Category: Judo
Date: 02 Oct 2001

Comments

how can i find bob mccormack and a contact number address etc????all help appreciated..

 

Old Budokwai Members

From: John Meyer
Category: Judo
Date: 27 Apr 2001

Comments

I was a member of the Budokwai from '84 to '94 and have fond memories of the club. If like me, you want to get in touch with old club members check out my new website at: www.lostschoolfriends.com where I have added a special entry for BJA clubs - all free! Telephone 01622 743151.

 

TELEPHONE NUMBERS
From: stephen gadd
Category: Judo
Date: 22 Apr 2001

Comments

Hi all, Can anyone help me in getting in contact with the following old BDK friday night members fom the mid 80's. Kevin Crickmar Joe Blanco Jon Dobson Costas Peter Blewett Jack Williams Colin Savage Nick Collins Dino Paul

e mail or tel number is good also.

Thanks

 

From: John Meyer
Category: Judo
Date: 27 Apr 2001

Comments

Hi Stephen, I was a Kyu Grade member in the mid 80's and recoginise most of the names including yours, but don't have the phone numbers! - And what's yours? You can register at the BUDOKWAI on www.lostschoolfriends.com or telpehone me in Maidstone on 01622 743151.

Do you know him? Maxwell Allen

 

From: Brian Carpenter
Category: Judo

Comments

I am trying to make contact with a friend of mine with whom I've lost touch. His name is Maxwell Allen and I believe he joined the Budokwai in about 1992 and was still a member when I last saw him in 1998. I'd be grateful if you could confirm that he is still a member of the club and whether it would be in order for me to write to him c/o the club. (webmaster comment - reply to me and I'll pass on to avoid address etc going on line

contact assitance

 

From: gweers@dave-world.net
Category: Judo

Comments

My name is George Weers. I am the Direct of the US Judo Assoc. Coaching Certification Program and a member of the US Judo Association Board of Directors. I am trying to locate Roy Inman in order to invite him as guest Coach for a national training camp in the USA.

Your assitance is greatly appreciated in this matter.

Thank You George

 

From: ryan osullivan
Category: Judo

Comments

how can i find bob mccormack and a contact number address etc????all help appreciated..

 

 

Looking for clubs

 

Re: JiuJitsu in Wembley

From: t3jn15hah@hotmail.com
Category: Martial Arts

Comments

I am trying to find any martial art clubs in sudbury wembley its for my children 6 & 8 if you know of any please lt me know.

thanks

Jiu JItsu clubs in Harrow, Wembley.....


From: Denise
Category: Martial Arts

Comments

HI, I'm tring to find a Jiu Jitsu club in close to Harrow, Wembley or Sudbury...or close to baker street in the city center.

thanks in advance D

 

Disabled People in judo

Disabled People in judo
From: Jim
Category: Judo

Comments

Dear Diana

I am a 1st dan in judo wirh the irish judo association and I am curious to know what your opinons are on disabled people paticipating in the sport of judo.

Also do you know of any judo competitons for people with cerabal pasley.

if you or anyone else wishes to answer me My address is fergusonok@NTLWORLD.COM

MANY THANKS

Jim

 

From: Diana - webmaster
Category: Judo

Comments

I think Judo can be enjoyed at any level and the techniques adapted for any disability. I dont know of any CP competitions or groups involved at the moment but will let you know if I find out. Best wishes - Diana

 

More Karate Information

From: Ian Cooke
Category: Karate

Comments

Congratulations on the Budokwai site.

I trained in Karate at the Budokwai for 5 years during the nineties and left the club after attaining Shodan.

Although I am aware and respect Budokwai's strong roots in Judo, I would very much like to see more Karate related articles including personality updates if possible. Eg. Is Kevin Healy still the Karate instructor?

Thanks.

 

From: Lynn Takeda
Category: Karate
Date: 27 Jun 2001

Comments

I agree totally with Ian Cooke. Though Budokwai originated as a Judo club, it is now a 'mult-talented' martial arts club catering to Judo, Aikido and Karate.

I am sure that we will all welcome contributions about Karate and Aikido.

Karate training - 1979-`82

 

From: Arthur  (Andy) W Freer
Category: Karate

Comments

I was one of the karateka students at the Budokwai between 1979-`82 training initially, under John Anderson and then Alan Wallace, Caesar Andrews and various guest instructors including Dave Hazard and Bob Poynton. Gradings being conducted by Sensei Enoeda and Sensei Tomita.

It was a period when there appeared to have been a well of new talent emerging with the likes of Craig Wray (now 5th dan?) amongst the students that comprised almost 50% of black & brown belts. Each major grading producing at least one new dan grade.

The classes were always full with virtually no room to move in the dojo and students from a bizarre range of professions ranging from stockbrokers, Sloane Rangers (one or two that achieved at least 1st kyu)to medics.

I took my 1st dan in 1982 then went abroad to work, taking my nidan in 1985 in foreign, sunnier climes.

Prior to joining the Budokwai, I had been studying in Manchester and initially took up Shotokan karate there. As I became more involved and `fanatical`, at weekends, I would travel to Liverpool to train at the Red Triangle club under instructors that included Terry O`Neil, Andy Sherry & Billy Higgins; indeed the cream of British karate and the core of the U.K.karate that were to win the world championships a number of times in the course of the eighties.

I now spend my working life in Hong Kong where there is a small Shotokan club and sometimes think back to the many good sessions I used to have at the Budokwai and would love to hear from anyone that knows me, trained with me or indeed any any news items regarding the personalities mentioned.

Arthur W Freer arthurfreer@yahoo.com

 

 

Olympic Judo

From: Syd Hoare
Category: Judo

Comments

Andy, The judo at this Olympics was not too bad, there were a number of spectacular ippons especially from the Japanese who did much better than usual at this level. The bent over grovellers were there as always but it is up to the straighter classical stylists to dispose of them I think. You have to allow a certain amount of realism into any combat art. It would be a bit like saying to a mugger we dont allow that style of attack in our martial art so do not bother me. Syd

 

Coments

Judoka Douillet Should Lead France into Sydney: Reigning Olympic heavyweight judo champion David Douillet should be handed the honour of carrying the French flag at the opening ceremony of this year's Sydney Olympic Games, according to an opinion poll. Thirty-three per cent of those polled by the Journal de Dimanche newspaper picked Douillet. Get the complete story by checking on news.

Link Recommendation for the Olympic Links Section

 

From: Mike
Category: Website

Comments

Here is a link recommendation for your Olympic Links Page.

Motivating memorabilia and collectibles to make you think and breathe Olympic Judo. :-)

Coubertin.com Olympic Collectors' Auction http://www.coubertin.com/ Olympic memorabilia and collectibles auction with medals, torches, tickets, programs, posters, mascots, badges, buttons and pins.

Many thanks, Mike Administrator http://www.coubertin.com/ Coubertin.com Olympic Collectors' Auction

From: Diana Birch
Category: Judo

Comments

I must admit that in general I agree with you. Although there were one or two nice ippons that I saw in the female fights. the injury rate in this type of modern Judo is unacceptably high for a sport - as opposed to a more gladiatoral activity. That's one of the reasons that the Kano Society is trying to revive interest in technique and traditional approaches. - I'm sure otehrs will want to comment on this too

 

MORE SENIOR PERSONALITIES

From: Alan Menzies
Category: Judo

Comments

MORE SENIOR PERSONALITIES  From: Alan.R.Menzies Category: General Comments Dr Diana Birch has produced an excellent site for the Budokwai and included in it personalities from some years ago, in fact many years ago. Unfortunately much of the information is out of date because the source was the Judo magazine published from the 1950's to the 1970's. I have volunteered to up date the information as much as possible and several entries are now under re-construction , however I do not have enough information to successfully up date all the entries. If your name is included , or more important if it has been omitted, please send me up to date details that may be be included in this section of the Budokwai Web Site. You can contact me as follows: e-mail wingfeld@ouvip.com Telephone 01579343773 Snail Mail - Wingfield House, Old Road, Liskeard, Cornwall, PL14 6DW Alan R. Menzies .

 

Secret Weapons of Jujutsu Book Announcement

From: Don Cunningham
Category: Martial Arts

Comments

I thought you might like to know that advance sales orders for my upcoming book, Secret Weapons of Jujutsu, are now being taken. You can learn more about the book and even place an advance order at: http://www.concentric.net/~Budokai/miscellany/new-book.htm Secret Weapons of Jujutsu will be available in September. The following is a brief description: The Japanese sword is much admired for its artistic value as well as for its practical merits. An emblem of the samurai's power and skill, it was venerated by the bushi, or warrior class. The sword was the “the soul of a samurai,” and swordsmanship was essential for survival on the battlefield. During the relative peace of the Tokugawa Era, though, the sword was often considered unsuitable or was even unavailable for use in certain situations. Furthermore, non-samurai townsmen, including feudal era police assistants, were prohibited from carrying swords. Both samurai and townsmen frequently had to rely on alternative non-lethal weapons for personal defense, including the creative use of many common, everyday objects. Secret Weapons of Jujutsu is the first book to appear in English that offers a detailed introduction to exotic defensive weapons like the tessen and jutte as well as other hibuki, or “concealed weapons.” Topics include the history and development of such weapons, as well as the philosophical and practical reasons for employing non-lethal alternatives. The tessen, literally meaning “iron fan,” was either an actual folding fan with metal ribs or a non-folding solid bar made of either iron or wood and shaped like a folded fan. The tessen was considered a symbol of authority as well as a common self-defense weapon for extraordinary situations. The jutte was an iron truncheon carried by feudal era police officers and their non-samurai assistants. Edo Period police developed many weapons and techniques against criminal violators, who were usually armed and frequently desperate. Essentially a defensive or restraining weapon, the jutte was popular because it could parry the slash of a razor-sharp sword and disarm an assailant without serious injury. Secret Weapons of Jujutsu provides an introduction to the defensive techniques of tetsushaku-jutsu, or the use of a one shaku long metal or wood weapon to disarm or disable an attacker. Techniques illustrated are from several different Japanese martial art traditions which incorporate aspects of tetsushaku-jutsu. Secret Weapons of Jujutsu will be a valuable learning tool and resource for all classical Japanese martial arts practitioners. The book is also available from the following online book sellers' web sites: Barnes and Noble - http://shop.barnesandnoble.com/booksearch/isbnInquiry.asp?isbn=0970280807 Amazon.com - http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/0970280807/102-8592363-9139327 I hope you like the book. Sincerely, Don Cunningham